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Jan. 24, 2023

s2e23 History of Prints Reproductive Prints (part three)

Platemark s2e23 continues hosts Ann Shafer and Tru Ludwig’s conversation on reproductive prints. For clarity, a reproductive print is one in which an artist creates a design (a drawing, painting, sculpture) and another artist creates a print after...


Platemark s2e23 continues hosts Ann Shafer and Tru Ludwig’s conversation on reproductive prints. Once again, for clarity, a reproductive print is one in which an artist creates a design (a drawing, painting, sculpture) and another artist creates a print after that original design. These can be sanctioned by the first artist or not or they can occur long after the first artist‘s death. It is customary to acknowledge all the artists in the strip of lettering at the bottom of the print (called the address). This way credit is given where due. Over time, reproductive prints became quite formulaic and staid—wait until we get to the early 19th century. When photography was developed in the 1830s, it wasn’t long before there was little need for the reproductive print.

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Israhel van Meckenem (German, c. 1445–1503) after Martin Schongauer (German, 1445–1491). Death of the Virgin, c. 1480/90. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 24.8 x 16.9 cm (9 3/4 x 6 5/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Martin Schongauer (German, 1445–1491). Death of the Virgin, c. 1470–74. Engraving. Plate: 25.7 x 16.8 cm. Achenbach Foundation, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.


Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471–1528). The Presentation in the Temple, from the series The Life of the Virgin, c. 1505. Woodcut. Sheet: 17 3/8 x 12 1/16 in. (44.2 x 30.6 cm.); image: 11 11/16 x 8 3/16 in. (29.7 x 20.8 cm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Marcantonio Raimondi (Italian, c. 1480–before 1534) after Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471–1528). The Presentation of Jesus to Simeon in the Temple, c. 1500–34. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed within platemark): 11 7/16 × 8 1/8 in. (29 × 20.7 cm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471–1528). Knight, Death, and the Devil, 1513. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed to platemark): 9 5/8 x 7 1/2 in. (245 x 190 mm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Master LCz (German, active c. 1480–1505). The Temptation of Christ, c. 1500/1505. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed to platemark): 227 x 165 mm. (8 15/16 x 6 ½ in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Martin Schongauer (German, c. 1435/50–1491). Saint Anthony Tormented by Demons, c. 1470–75. Engraving. Sheet: 30 x 21.8 cm (11 13/16 x 8 9/16 in). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471–1528). The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, from the series The Apocalypse, 1498. Woodcut. 393 x 285 mm (15 1/2 x 11 1/4 in). Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore.

 
Laocoön and His Sons, c. 200 BCE–70 CE. Marble. 208 × 163 × 112 cm. (6’ 10 » × 5’ 4 » × 3’ 8 »). Vatican Museums, Vatican City.


The Dying Gaul, Roman copy after a sculpture situated in the Pergamon Acropolis. Photo: DEA / G. NIMATALLAH/Getty Images.


Winged Victory of Samothrace, 2nd century BCE. Marble. Height: 2.75 m. Louvre, Paris.


Marco Dente da Ravenna (Italian, active by 1515–1527). Laocoön and his two sons being attacked by serpents, c. 1506. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed to platemark): 11 1/8 × 15 5/8 in. (282 × 397 mm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Marco Dente da Ravenna (Italian, active 1515–1527). Laocoön and his two sons being attacked by serpents, c. 1520. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed to platemark): 17 7/16 × 12 15/16 in. (443 × 329 mm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Nicolas Beatrizet (French, 1515–c. 1566). Laocoön, 16th century. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed to platemark): 17 1/2 x 12 3/16 in. (44.5 x 31 cm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


William Blake (British, 1757–1827). Laocoön, c. 1826–27. Engraving.


Félix Bracquemond (French, 1833–1914). Portrait of Edmond de Goncourt, 1881–82. Etching and drypoint (eighth state of eight). Plate: 510 x 339 mm (20 1/16 x 13 3/8 in.). Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN.


Félix Bracquemond (French, 1833–1914). Portrait of Edmond de Goncourt, 1881–82. Etching and drypoint (first state of eight). Plate: 510 x 339 mm (20 1/16 x 13 3/8 in.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). David, 1504. Marble. Height: 16.9 ft. Galleriea dell’Accademia, Florence.


Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). Awakening Slave, c. 1520–23. Marble. Height : 267 cm. Galleriea dell’Accademia, Florence.


Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). The Atlas, c. 1530–34. Marble. Height : 277 cm. Galleriea dell’Accademia, Florence.


Giorgio Ghisi (Italian, 1520–1582) after Raphael (Italian, 1483–1520). The School of Athens, 1550. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed within platemark): 513 x 810 mm. (20 3/8 x 31 7/8 in.). British Museum, London.


Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). The Last Judgment, 1536–41. Fresco. 13.7 m × 12 m (45 × 39 ft.). Sistine Chapel, Vatican City.


Giulio Bonasone (Italian, 1531–after 1576) after Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). The Last Judgment, 1546–50. Engraving. Sheet: 22 13/16 × 17 3/8 in. (58 × 44.2 cm). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Martin Rota (Italian, c. 1520–1583) after Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). The Last Judgment, 1569. Engraving. Sheet : 318 x 233 mm.). British Museum, London.


Giorgio Ghisi (Italian, 1520–1582) after Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). The Last Judgment, c. 1545–1565. Engraving. Sheet: 1202 x 1055 mm. (47 3/8 x 41 ½ in.). Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary.


Domenico del Barbiere (Italian, 1506–1565) after Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). Group from Last Judgment, St. Bartholomew, St. Peter, and other Apostles, n.d. Engraving. Sheet: 14 3/4 x 8 7/8 in. (37.5 x 22.5 cm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Giorgio Ghisi (Italian, c. 1520–1852) after Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). The Delphic Sibyl, from the series of Prophets and Sibyls in the Sistine Chapel, 1570–75. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed to platemark): 22 1/4 × 16 9/16 in. (56.5 × 42 cm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452–1519). Madonna and Child with St. Anne and the Young St. John, 1507–08. Charcoal heightened with white chalk. 141.5 x 106 cm. National Gallery, London.


Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). Pietà, 1498–99. Marble. 174 × 195 cm (68.5 × 76.8 in). St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican City.


Raphael (Italian, 1483–1520). Madonna of the Goldfinch, 1506. Oil on wood. 107 x 77.2 cm. Uffizi Gallery, Florence.


Pontormo (Italian, 1494–1557). Descent from the Cross, c. 1528. Oil on panel. 313 x 192 cm. (85 x 75 in.). Capponi Chapel, Santa Felicita, Florence.


Parmigianino (Italian, 1503–1540). Madonna and Child with Angels (Madonna with the Long Neck), c. 1534–40. Oil on panel. 216.5 x 132.5 cm. Uffizi Gallery, Florence.


Tru Ludwig with garden statuary.


Domenico Beccafumi (Italian, 1486–1551). Apostle Holding a Tablet, 1500–52. Chiaroscuro woodcut. 40.9 x 21.4 cm. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.


Michelangelo (Italian, 1475–1564). Moses from the Tomb of Pope Julius II, c. 1513–15. Marble. 235 x 210 cm. (92 ½ x 82 5/8 in.). San Pietro in Vincoli, Rome.


Ugo da Carpi (Italian, c. 1470–1532) after Parmigianino (Italian, 1503–1540). Diogenes, c. 1527–30. Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from four blocks in gray-green. Image: 18 11/16 x 13 5/8 in. (475 x 346 mm.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Giovanni Jacopo Caraglio (Italian, c. 1500/05–1565). Diogenes, c. 1526–27. Engraving. Sheet: 286 x 217 mm. (11 ¼ x 8 9/16 in.). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Antonio da Trento (Italian, c. 1508–1550) after Parmigianino (Italian, 1503–1540). The Martyrdom of Saints Peter and Paul, c. 1530. Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from three blocks in dark green (line block), gray-green, and light gray-brown. Sheet: 28.5 x 46 cm (11 1/4 x 18 1/8 in.). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Giovanni Jacopo Caraglio (Italian, c. 1500/05–1565) after Parmigianino (Italian, 1503–1540). The Martyrdom of Saints Peter and Paul, 1524–27. Engraving. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Raphael (Italian, 1483–1520). School of Athens, 1509–11. Stanza della Segnatura, Apostolic Palace, Vatican.


Giorgio Ghisi (Italian, 1520–1582), after Raphael (Italian, 1483–1520). The School of Athens, 1550. Engraving. Sheet (trimmed within platemark): 513 x 810 mm. (20 3/8 x 31 7/8 in.). British Museum, London.


Giorgio Ghisi (Italian, 1520–1582), after Giovanni Battista Bertani (Italian, 1516–1576). Hercules Victorious Over the Hydra, c. 1558. Engraving. Plate: 35 x 20.8 cm. (13 3/4 x 8 3/16 in.). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

 

Selected Bibliography

Linda Hults. The Print in the Western World: An Introductory History. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1996.

Rebecca Zorach and Elizabeth Rodini, editors. Paper Museums: The Reproductive Print in Europe, 1500–1800. Chicago: Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, 2005.

Antony Griffiths. The Print Before Photography: An Introduction to European Printmaking 1550–1820. London: British Museum, 2016.

 

Platemark is produced by Ann Shafer
Series one co-host: Ben Levy
Series two co-host: Tru Ludwig
Theme music:
Michael Diamond